Mustangs with a Message

animal communication Oct 09, 2021

Horse energy reminds us to live with open hearts, while embracing freedom and collaboration

This week, I want to give voice to some of the wild mustangs that are surviving in the western states.  If you have been following the news with the BLM round ups, you may find this communication with a herd of wild horses insightful.

 

I connected with a herd near the Oregon/Washington border.  Yes, animal communicators can communicate with individual animals and collectives.  (I teach you how to access the herd in my courses.)

As I connected there was a collective voice.  I asked them if they are ok.  Were they captured with the latest round up?  They replied that they were ok now.  There was a roundup and they really disliked it.  The big noisy bird was the scariest part of it.  I believe they are referring to the helicopter.

I inquired to see if there was a lead animal that wanted to speak up.  The lead, elder mare spoke up.

 

She informed me she and her herd are doing well right now.  They have been captured and released from the humans, she tells me.  The roundup was a stressful situation with much fear of the young being separated from their mothers.  They know there are other horses that did not get released but were kept in the pens.

She told me they are avoiding the “spot” that they were captured, just to be safe.  She described a flat, dry grassy area along the Oregon/Washington Eastern border.

I apologized to her for the stress that my kind has brought to her and her family.  She accepted my apology and we continue to talk.

She said there are neighboring herds that keep an eye out for the other herds, in a good way.  When they have grazed enough in a great spot, they know it’s wise to move away from that location, so others can benefit from it too.

 

I asked her if that compassion has helped them to survive. 

She told me a story that was told to her, long ago.  She was told that long ago, many generations ago, there was a territorial disagreement with a particular fertile area.  Food was limited that year and the humans were taking away more lands from the horses.  She said her ancestors had nearly starved until the opposing herd leader took over their herd and made it a combined herd. 

Since that happened, decades ago, she tells me, they know the value of working together and in harmony with each other – not just with all horses, but with all living things.  She says, they try to avoid the areas where the humans want to grow but that seems to keep changing and it feels like their territory is shrinking. 

 

Then she tells me, “All living things have the ability to get along with one another.  Yes, there is competition for resources, yet there seems to be enough food and water, when we move, when we need to travel further distances than usual, in order to survive. “

 

I smiled and I said, “Oh, are you reminding humans to be more creative with using our resources?”  She nodded, “Yes, the talents of humans with their creative minds, can be working on creative solutions to land and water issues.”  Instead of stretching their grasp of land and water, they can develop different ways of living….maybe less sedentary and more transitory, like us.” 

 

These messages are important for humanity, as our actions impact all living things. Finding a better way to manage the lands for these beautiful, sentient beings is key to their survival, and eventually our own survival. 

 

There is a new documentary coming out this week The Mustangs:  America’s First Wild Horses.  

I encourage you to see it to learn more about their plight and their fight for survival. 

If you feel called to do more here are a few more resources for you to research:

Here's a video to explain the roundups:  AWHC video

Learn more about dangerous vs safe roundups : American Wild Horse Campaign website

 Please share this article with others so our voices can help the wild horses.